Tag Archives: military pets


SUMMER ROUND UP II – Reunions, Virtual 5K & Abigail

 

PCS & Pet Reunion Success Stories / A Virtual 5K Race to Benefit Dogs on Deployment’s Pet Chit Financial Assistance Program. …PLUS AN UPDATE ON “BONNETS FOR ABIGAIL!”

PET CHIT FINANCIAL ASSISTANCE PROGRAM

Dogs on Deployment understands that pets do a great deal to enhance and complete our lives in numerous ways. We aim to promote responsible, lifelong pet ownership within the military-pet community. Dogs on Deployment’s military-pet foster network reunites as many military families with their pets as possible, and the Pet Chit Financial Assistance Program helps with the financial costs.

Pet Chit Success Stories Keep Military Members & Pets Together

“Captain Jones”

“Captain” Jones, at your service.

Caitlin Jones, an E-3 in the US Marine Corps, served and lived with her family in Okinawa, Japan. They have enjoyed the love and company of their Great Dane, “Captain,” since he was a puppy. “He is a huge part of our family, no pun intended,” said Caitlin. The Jones family was expecting their next PCS in 2018, but when Caitlain’s spouse needed to be medically discharged from service, they were left financially unprepared for the cost of suddenly flying Captain back to the United States as unaccompanied cargo. A Pet Chit was granted to the Jones family to help with expenses.

 

After Captain safely returned to his family, Caitlin said, “thank you Dogs on Deployment – we appreciate your consideration and help with Captain’s flight!”

 

 

 “Smeagles” Scherrer

After seven years of service in Okinawa, Japan, Joshua Scherrer, E-6, US Coast Guard, received orders to PCS to Frederick, Maryland this summer. Josh and his wife prepared to travel back to the states with their three rescue pets – a dog and two cats. Their military chartered flight back home allowed for the two cats to return with the Scherrer family, but there was no space left for their dog, “Smeagles.”

The adorable Smeagles is once again a happy camper.

It was a stressful time said Josh, noting that “when we got to Seattle, WA, we had to purchase a car so we could drive cross country for our new PCS. Then I was informed that we would need to purchase new housing appliances upon arrival in Maryland. Almost Home Pet Transportation recommended that I reach out to Dogs on Deployment to apply for help with the cost of Smeagles’ transport.” A Pet Chit was granted to the Scherrer family to help with the expense.

 

After Smeagles was reunited with the rest of the family, Josh told us “all went well with the pets! Thank you to the organization, and we’re happy to be featured in the Dogs on Deployment blog – sharing our story is the least we can do for you all. We are all very grateful!”

 

Stella Thornborrow

“Stella!” How cute is she?!

Alexander Thornborrow, E-4, US Army, received orders to PCS to Germany, and with his wife, Kelly, planned to bring their rescue dog, Stella with them. Said Alex previously, “Stella has been through a lot, and is a huge member of our family. But my wife’s student loans and other expenses made the cost of shipping our dog a hardship.” The Thornborrow family applied for financial assistance and were granted a Pet Chit.

Stella finally arrives in Germany to reunite with dad, Alex.

 

Kelly Thornborrow told Dogs on Deployment, “Stella made it to Germany despite some paperwork confusion. She was happily reunited with us and has settled into life in Germany. We are so grateful for the Pet Chit, it helped us all begin our new life here together as a family! Being with our dog again has made our transition in a new country so much easier – we will always hold a special place in our hearts for Dogs on Deployment. Thanks again!!”

 

Willow Mata

Sunnie Mata, E-5, US Air Force, received orders to PCS to Germany, and was looking forward to making the move with her son and their dog, Willow. In preparation for their new life, Sunnie began saving all she could in the hopes of buying a house off base with a big yard for Willow.

 

The Mata Family

 

“Willow is not just a dog, she is a family member,” said Sunnie. “I am a single parent to a five-year old boy, and we searched for the perfect dog to join our family. When we first saw Willow, it was instant love – she fits in so well with us!”

 

 

 

Best buddies.

 

Who is photo-bombing who in this picture?

Willow’s size exceeded the weight limit for the military flight to Germany, so the Mata family had to make other arrangements. Dogs on Deployment granted Sunnie a Pet Chit so that Willow could join them in Germany and keep a smile on her son’s face. Afterwards, Sunnie told Dogs on Deployment, “Everything is going as planned so far. We couldn’t have done it without your help, and are so grateful. Thank you!”

 

Dogs on Deployment’s First Annual 5K Pet & Family Trot

Registration has begun for Dogs on Deployment’s First Annual Pet and Family Trot (PFT), a “virtual race” that will benefit our non-profit organization’s critical mission of providing a robust network for military members to find volunteers willing to care for their pets while they’re away serving our country. Register now, and run through August 31st to participate!

A virtual race is a race that can be ran at any location. You can walk, use the treadmill, run outside or participate in another race. You can run your race at your pace wherever you like, however you’d like.

Some FAQs About the First Annual (PFT)

How does a virtual race work? A virtual race can be done at any venue that you wish. You can walk, jog, skip or run the distance of your choice. You can complete your race at the gym on a treadmill, a practice run in town, a stroll in the park, or another local racing event. The Dogs on Deployment PFT believes in the honor system so no proof is required for your race, but it would be awesome if you could upload pictures and tell us about your experience on our Facebook page. All race participants, human and canine, will be about to download a race bib and will be mailed a finisher’s medal.

Why should I do a virtual race? The short answer would be because they are cool! If you need more convincing, the top 3 reasons would include:

  • The chance to add a really cool medal to your collection (and a really cool collar charm for your pup!).
  • Complete control over your schedule. Complete the race on your own time, at your own venue. No travel expenses, no hassle with parking, no waking up early (unless you want to!).
  • An opportunity to support a great cause. Proceeds from the 5K will benefit Dogs on Deployment’s Pet Chit Financial Assistant Program. These Pet Chits help to provide financial assistance to qualifying military members for help with pet care during times of need. It is no surprise that a military lifestyle can be challenging on an individual and family, and an unexpected pet expense may cause undue stress before an upcoming service commitment.

 

 

Who can participate? Everybody and anybody! There is no age limit and there are no restrictions. So run, jog, walk, crawl, run alone, run in a group, run with your pet, bike, hike, it doesn’t matter. Just get out there and get moving!

Can I complete the race with a group? Of course! You can register for the 5k as an individual or as part of a team!

Do the medals come with a ribbon? Yes! Every medal will come with a ribbon!🏅

When you register yourself and your pet for the trot/race you will both receive a finisher’s medal. Your dog can proudly wear the pet medallion on their collar.

When will my medal ship? Medals will be ready to ship on August 23rd, so they will come your way once you have completed the PFT! We will keep you posted if they will ship any sooner (fingers and paws crossed).

We can’t wait to see you hit the pavement! Lace up your 👟, grab your 🐕 leash and let’s go!🐾 Still have questions? Email us today at run@dogsondeployment.org and we will answer any questions you have.

 

Bonnets for Abigail Updates

“Bonnets for Abigail” supports the mission of Dogs on Deployment. (See link to her story by clicking here.) We told you in a recent blog post of sweet Abigail, a dog abused and left for dead, who was rescued, rehabilitated and who went on to be an international spokes-dog, helping raise awareness to end dog fighting. Abigail is a beacon of hope, and love.

 

Bonnets, bonnets. bonnets!

Abigail is nominated for the 2017 American Humane’s Emerging Hero Dog Award, and has selected Dogs on Deployment as her charity partner. She already won Round One of the competition – congratulations Abby! As a result, “Bonnets for Abigail” donated $2500.00 to Dogs on Deployment. If Abigail wins top honors and takes home the title of 2017 American Hero Dog, an additional $5,000 will be awarded to Dogs on Deployment – everybody wins!!

VOTE – VOTE – VOTE DAILY!

We need your daily votes to show your support for Abigail. Click here once every day http://herodogawards.org/dog/abigail/ now through August 30, and vote for Abigail as top dog. Help Dogs on Deployment and help Abigail to be an ambassador, teacher and hero dog for all!

 

Now life is just a walk in the park for Abigail!

Abigail has Found Fur-Ever Love!

Last but not least, we happily report that Abigail has been adopted into her fur-ever home. She recently joined her mother, father and fur-sister (also a rescued pit-mix) in their digs, and everyone has been enjoying the Florida sunshine, and one another.

The adventures of “Bonnets for Abigail” can be seen on Facebook every day (click here to check it out), where sweet Abigail now has a loyal following of about 19,000 followers. That’s one popular pooch!

Good luck Abigail – we’ll see you and your bonnets on the red carpet for the awards show!!

 

Summer Round Up: Pet Boarding, PCS & Pet Reunion Success

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People Helping One Another, One Paw at a Time

Everyone at Dogs on Deployment voluntarily gives of their time and talents as a way of saying “thank you” to the many U.S. military service men and women who temporarily part with their pets when duty calls.

Our nationwide network of volunteers includes pet boarders and foster pet parents whose participation is critical to Dogs on Deployment’s success. This community of people continues to grow and open their homes and hearts to temporarily care for pets – like dogs, cats, rabbits, etc. The result is peace of mind for the military pet owner. We are grateful to them all, and always happy to share good news and success stories when they are brought to our attention!

Pet Boarding: Leppla Family Saves the Day for a Very Grateful Mark Howard

The care and cooperation of boarders Kevin and Margaret Leppla left Mark Howards very grateful. He wanted to recognize and thank them publicly. The Leppla family recently cared for both of Mark’s dogs, one being a Labrador Retriever and the other, a Jack Russell Terrier.

 

DoD volunteer boarder, Kevin Leppla relaxes with Capone, a 2 ½-year-old, male Jack Russell Terrier, and Nip, a 2 ½-year-old, female Labrador Retriever.

Mark Howard, of the U.S. Army, told Dogs on Deployment, “initially, I had loads of inquiries for my Lab, but only three for my Jack Russell because of the patience and care it can sometimes take to look after this high-energy breed. This was my first time using the organization and I was a little hesitant, especially since I was unable to properly meet with the boarders.” Potential Dogs on Deployment boarders and their pets usually meet face-to-face with military members and their pets before the deal is sealed. Sometimes, like in Mark’s case, time constraints or other deployment factors get in the way of “proper” introductions.

Since Mark was unable to go through the typical interviews before boarding his dogs, he said, “I was a little nervous and worried about how both dogs would be, but agreed to it. “As it turns out, Kevin and Margaret Leppla, from Yelm, Washington stepped up, and were both extremely amazing taking care of both of dogs while I was deployed! They even included them in family reunions and activities. I believe the Leppla family went above and beyond, treating my dogs as if they were their own, and feel they deserve to be recognized.”

 

Capone and Nip explore, lakeside with Kevin.

“It was a perfect match from the beginning,” said Mark. While boarding with the Leppla family on a small farm, Mark’s dogs Capone and Nip got to enjoy the beautiful property, with lots of room and space to run and play. “Kevin and Margaret were wonderful. They treated my dogs like family and it shows. The dogs have gone along on family BBQ outings in the wood lines, lakes…, just about anywhere you could think of. And they always kept me informed on everything going on, sending pictures and videos all the time!”

 

Pet Chit Financial Assistance Program – Less Stress for PCS

Dogs on Deployment understands that pets do a great deal to enhance and complete our lives in numerous ways. DoD aims to promote responsible, lifelong pet ownership within the military-pet community. Dogs on Deployment’s military-pet foster network reunites as many military families with their pets as possible, and the Pet Chit Financial Assistance Program helps with the financial costs.

“Thank you so much,” said Jonathan Kamer, U.S.M.C., E-5, and wife Mae, after they were reunited with their dogs. Jonathan recently received a 3-year PCS to Okinawa, Japan.

The Kamer family reunites.

“Our two dogs are not just pets, they are our family. We have always committed to staying together, no matter what difficult circumstances we were going through.” That’s why the Kamers were so disappointed when financial constraints initially kept them separated from their dogs. Dogs Chevy and Saver were only temporarily able to stay with family in the U.S., and that’s when Jonathan reached out to the Dogs on Deployment Pet Chit Financial Assistance Program. He and his wife patiently waited for a Pet Chit to be granted, but every day it became a little more heartbreaking while they watched other families enjoying their own dogs. “It was unimaginable to think we could be apart from our dogs for three years,” said Jonathan. “You never know what could happen within that period.”

The adorable Chevy and Saver Kamer.

The Kamers’ prayers were answered when they were granted a Pet Chit for $2200. It helped cover transportation expenses for dogs Saver, a male tan boxer, and Chevy, a female boxer-mix to be flown to Okinawa. The dogs arrived safely and the entire Kamer family was reunited.

Jonathan Kamer relaxes with the help of dogs, Saver and Chevy.

 

 

“We feel so blessed by Dogs on Deployment. It is a wonderful and helpful organization that has enabled us all to be together as a family once again,” added Jonathan. “Thank you so much!”

 

 

 

 

 

Recent Reunions

While voluntarily serving a one-year tour in South Korea without his family, Steve Zavala, U.S. Army, E-6 of Alaska, adopted a cat from the on-base pet shelter. He eventually learned he and his family would have to PCS to England, and wanted to keep his family and his newest companion Jack the cat all together. The Zavala family received a Pet Chit to help transport Jack, and are extremely grateful.

Jack cuddles with his big brother and sister from the Zavala family.

 

 

Richard Hager III, U.S.M.C., E-5 of North Carolina, received PCS to Japan. He and his wife and children consider their pets a part of the family. “Our dogs, Maggie and Marley are very good with our children and have helped them grow into the pet lovers that they are today,” said Richard. “The dogs have been in our family for the past 9 and 7 years respectively.”

The family received a Pet Chit to help transport the dogs.

The Hager family baby shown sharing a special moment with Maggie the dog.

 

 

Joshua Broadie, U.S.A.F., E-4 of Oklahoma, received PCS to Germany. He and his wife previously got an emotional support dog for their 7-year-old daughter to help with her panic attacks. Space limitations originally prohibited the dog from traveling overseas to be with his family. Said Joshua, “Our dog is important to my daughter and to us. I could not and would not leave her behind.”

The family was grateful to Dogs on Deployment when they received a Pet Chit to help transport the dog for a family reunion.

Shown here is the Broadie’s daughter, together again with her therapy dog, Ruder.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Grayson Bright, U.S.C.G, E-5 of Kentucky, previously received PCS to Japan and at first, left his cat, Marshmallow in the loving care of temporary DoD boarder, Mary Mortenson. After patiently waiting, Grayson will soon be happily reunited with his cat, since he received a Pet Chit to help transport her overseas.

This stunning cat, Marshmallow will soon be reunited with owner, Grayson Bright.

 

Pet Chits Can Help with Emergency Veterinary Treatment & Care

Dogs on Deployment understands the financial burden of pet care can take a large financial toll on a military family when other unexpected life events arise. Pet Chits are also granted to military members to help offset the costs associated with emergency or routine veterinary pet care, including spay and neuter, which Dogs on Deployment is a strong advocate of.

 

Mark Daniels, U.S.M.C. E-6, of CA and his wife Jessica received financial assistance for the spay of their beautiful kitty Phasma, who was helped through the Pet Chit program. They were very thankful to Dogs on Deployment!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Robert Hattan, U.S. Army E-6, of LA told us that his dog, sweet Hazel “has become family to me!” He adopted her after she was abandoned by her owners, and only wants to do the right thing by her. Robert received financial assistance to help with costs of Hazel’s vaccinations.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Michael Craddock, U.S.M.C. E-5, of CA and his family recognize the importance of spaying and neutering pets. “We want to be responsible pet owners and take care of Jaxson’s neutering so he isn’t able to procreate with any of the nearby dogs.”

 

Dogs on Deployment lent a hand/paw with the costs of the dog’s procedure. Adorable Jaxson smiled for the camera after finding out he would benefit from the Pet Chit program.

 

 

 

 

Jacquie Nichols Mikolaczyk Awarded Volunteer of the Quarter 3, 2016

Dogs on Deployment Volunteer, Jacquie Nichols Mikolaczyk
of Pensacola, FL, Earns Distinction with
Volunteer of the Quarter 3, 2016 Award

 

Jackie Nichols Mikolaczyk, Gulf Coast DoD Coordinator, with Alisa Johnson, President and Co-Founder, Dogs on Deployment

 

Jacquie Nichols Mikolaczyk Recognized for her Efforts and Dedication to Dogs on Deployment

Dogs on Deployment is an organization completely staffed by volunteers, without whom, our mission would be impossible. Each person that supports Dogs on Deployments shares a few things in common, namely compassion, motivation, and honor. Each quarter, the Board of Directors chooses one of our many volunteers to be recognized for their genuine contribution, steadfast volunteerism, and unwavering support of our service members and their pets.

Alisa Johnson, President and Co-Founder of Dogs on Deployment, proudly announced that Jacquie Nichols Mikolaczyk is the recipient of our “Volunteer of the Quarter” award for the third quarter of 2016. The event was recorded, and the link provided here will take you to that video, on our Facebook – DoD: Gulf Coast page.

https://www.facebook.com/pg/DoDGulfCoast/videos/?ref=page_internal

 

Passion & Conviction, Onward…

Since the summer of 2014, Jacquie has been an important member of the Dogs on Deployment team. She first began volunteering with Dogs on Deployment in the Pensacola, Florida region of the country. There, she impressed other volunteers with her dedication to the cause, and her driving passion to promote the mission of Dogs on Deployment.

When the previous Pensacola Local Coordinator for Dogs on Deployment moved from the area, Jacquie was the obvious choice to step up in the vacant role. She enthusiastically accepted the position, and soon proved that she was up for the challenge, far exceeding the expectations of the leaders of the organization.

Jacquie has a contagious spunk and has never meet a stranger. She was responsible for coordinating several events in and around the Pensacola and Lower Alabama areas, including several successful Beer, Dog, Veteran fundraising events, and Dogs on Deployment’s first ever Poker Run. As a direct result of Jacquis’ networking efforts, the Pensacola, FL Chapter of Dogs on Deployment gained several important donors and sponsors in the area — including Navy Federal Credit Union, Harley Davidson of Pensacola, and Pen Air Federal Credit Union.

 

Jacquie, representing DoD at Beer, Dogs and Veterans event
Jacquie at the Marine Corps League Speaking Series, with Retired Navy Pilot Honored for Native American Heritage

 

 

 

… and Upward

In 2016, when the position for Dogs on Deployment, Gulf Coast Regional Coordinator became vacant, once again, Jacquie was the obvious choice to step up to this role and begin leading the entire Gulf Coast.

Since taking over in that capacity, Jacquie has put the growth and success of the Gulf Coast Region into hyperdrive, while continuing to grow the local Pensacola Chapter. She has brought on new, passionate local coordinators in both Huntsville, AL and Jacksonville, FL along with many more volunteers. She not only works hard, but works to recognize the volunteers around her through her “Feel Good Friday” Facebook posts.

At the recent award ceremony, Jackie told us, “I have never been more honored to a part of an organization than I was today. I get to do something I love to do, along with people that have become a family — Dogs on Deployment. Thank you so very much!”

 

High Praise from Dogs on Deployment President, Alisa Johnson

“Jacquie is a motivated, passionate and reliable leader. Her dedication to Dogs on Deployment has been a tremendous asset to those around her, and those throughout the organization. She is a respected member of the team not only by her fellow volunteers, but also by the Board of Directors. Jacquie willingly makes herself available, offers her attendance whenever needed, and demonstrates a genuine passion for the organization’s mission.”

President & Co-Founder, Dogs on Deployment, Alisa Johnson added, “Due to her hard work, contagious positivity, and strong dedication, I am sincerely proud to call Jacquie a team member of Dogs on Deployment. Keep up the good work!

We look forward to your continued support for many years to come.”

 

 

Life-Saving Spay/Neuter Programs & Pet Chit Updates

 

Military Members Receive DoD Pet Chits & Support when Seeking Veterinary Care

 

Dogs on Deployment understands that pets do a great deal to enhance and complete our lives in numerous ways. DoD aims to promote responsible, lifelong pet ownership within the military-pet community. Dogs on Deployment’s military-pet foster network reunites as many military families with their pets as possible, and the Pet Chit Financial Assistance Program helps with the financial costs.

Dogs on Deployment Pet Chits have helped military members with veterinary expenses, including the costs of spaying and neutering. It’s part of our responsibility to emphasize the importance of these procedures, particularly now as the Humane Society of the United States prepares to celebrate World Spay Day on February 28, 2017. (See http://www.humanesociety.org/issues/spay_day/?referrer=https://www.google.com/ for details).

Veterinarians have determined:

  • Spaying our female pets and neutering our male pets helps us to prevent further pet overpopulation. Overpopulation in shelters leads to senseless euthanasia every single day.
  • Spaying females helps prevent uterine infections and breast tumors – which are malignant or cancerous in roughly 50 percent of dogs and 90 percent of cats. Spaying female pets before their first heat (when they become reproductive) will offer them the best protection from these diseases.
  • Neutering our male pets prevents diseases like testicular cancer and some prostrate problems. It can also help eliminate behavioral issues like urinating to “mark,” or designate a spot.

 

SNAP to It

To help educate and assist military pet owners in spaying and neutering their companion animals, Dogs on Deployment has partnered in San Diego, CA with the Spay Neuter Action Project (SNAP). The efforts of Rich Setzer, DoD Coordinator in San Diego, made this possible. He takes every opportunity to publicize the program and to educate active duty personnel.

 

 

Rich Setzer had specific goals in mind when he initiated the DoD partnership with San Diego SNAP. He sought to:

  • Inform the local military community about Dogs on Deployment;
  • Publicize our financial assistance Pet Chit assistance program;
  • Provide a way for junior enlisted service members (E-6 and below) to get their pets spayed or neutered at no cost to them; and,
  • Spend the DoD Pet Chit funds in the most effective way possible.

After laying the groundwork, and having multiple discussions to work out the details, the Mil-SNAP program was rolled out in October 2016.

Rich says, “now whenever someone calls SNAP to schedule surgery, among the first questions their Intake Coordinators ask is whether the pet owner is military — and what their pay grade is. If that pet owner qualifies, SNAP staff informs them about the Mil-SNAP program, and provides them with access to a Dogs on Deployment Pet Chit application.”

Many military families who have benefited from Pet Chit assistance expressed their gratitude to SNAP, to DoD, and Rich in particular — see some of their happy Pet Chit updates in the stories that follow!

 

Successful Pet Chit Stories & Spay/Neuter Updates

 

Hatchie the Husky – Torres Family

“Hatchie came to us after he was abandoned. Siberian Huskies, as we found out, are known to be great escape artists,” said Lucy Torres, E-6, of the US Coast Guard. “Since he was already a three year old dog, Hatchie needed to be neutered right away. Through the SNAP program we found Dogs on Deployment. The procedure was easy, and the people involved at SNAP took care of Hatchie as if he was part of their own family.”

“The dog was groggy for a while post-surgery, and for the following week had to wear his ‘cone of shame.’ After that though, Hatchie was able to return to his favorite activities and he continues to get to know and enjoy us, his new family. Thanks Dogs on Deployment!”

 

Jager the Dog – Atnip Family

“Jager is honored to be part of your blog,” says Chelsea Atnip, wife of Daniel Atnip, E-5, of the US Coast Guard. Dogs on Deployment makes it so much easier for military families to take care of their fur babies – thank you so much for considering us!”

 

 

Jager is an awesome, seven-month-old mixed breed dog, who loves playing with his older buddy Spaz, as well as sometimes harassing the kitty. He has tons of energy and loves going for hikes. Post his neuter procedure, Jager had to wear the protective cone, but healed very well and is doing great. He can again enjoy trips to the beach, which is a favorite spot. Chelsea added, “we are so grateful to DoD and to the wonderful people at SNAP for offering such a great program for our family! Thanks again!”

 

Winter the Cat – Barber Family

Winter is a beautiful, female Norwegian Forest Mainecoon mix cat, who belongs to Margaret and Michael Barber, E-3, US Coast Guard. She was recently spayed through the SNAP program. “Thank you,” says Margaret Barber.

“The SNAP group was professional, extremely organized and efficient. Winter received a blue soft cone collar after surgery, and her recovery was wonderful. Watching her shaved belly fill back in only took about a week. I’ve already recommended SNAP to a few other military families in need of spay and neuter services for their pets.”

 

More Gratitude for Spay & Neuter Successes

Gonzalez Family: Juan Colon Gonzales, US Coast Guard, indicated that his family had two male dogs, neither of which was previously neutered. They used SNAP to neuter both their Husky, and their Pomerian, Jack, pictured here.

 

Tandoc Family: Jusper Tandoc, E-4, US Coast Guard and family had their dog Cujo (pictured below) neutered with SNAP.

 

Melendez Family: Jonathan Melendez, E-4, US Marine Corps and his family had their dog Milo (pictured below) neutered with SNAP.

 

Snyder Family: Lukas Snyder, E-5, US Coast Guard and wife, Haley had their dog Max (pictured below) neutered with SNAP.

 

 

REMIND YOUR FAMILY AND FRIENDS TO SPAY AND NEUTER! 

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Dogs on Deployment Cheers Belle T634

 

Military Pet of the Year 2016 Recipient Marches On

Every dog has his or her day, and in our case, every dog has its year!

Dogs on Deployment cheers on as Military Pet of The Year 2016 Recipient Belle T634 and proud owners, Sam and Jessica Wettstein, step aside to make way for the soon to be announced winner of the MPOTY 2017 contest.

It has been a banner year for the beloved Belle, our current Dogs on Deployment MPOTY 2016 and mascot. She is shown here with Sgt. Sam Wettstein.

 

Well Wishes and Questions with Sam and Jessica Wettstein, Belle’s Family

Dogs on Deployment bids a fond farewell to Military Pet of The Year 2016 Recipient Belle T634, and her proud owners, Sam and Jessica Wettstein. Sam serves as Sgt., USMC. Belle originally served as a military work dog for her handler, Sgt. Wettstein. The duo trained together for a year and served together in the USMC for seven months overseas.

Sam and Jessica Wettstein shared their thoughts on what life was like after Belle was named MPOTY 2016.

 

DOGS ON DEPLOYMENT: 

What was your favorite thing about Belle being named MPOTY 2016?

“We loved the opportunities Dogs on Deployment gave us to share Belle and Sam’s story. Even though she is now retired, Belle had a new purpose and was still able to help others by sharing her story.

We also loved being welcomed into a new family — the Dogs on Deployment family. We made friends all over the country that we now have for life!

Belle would like to add that one of her favorite things was all the gifts she received from her sponsors! There were treats, paintings, a new custom bed, new collars, a cuddle clone, and so much more. The outpouring of love was overwhelming and Belle wants us to say thank you on her behalf!”

 

DOGS ON DEPLOYMENT: 

During Belle’s reign as MPOTY 2016, you all had a chance to travel, acting as “Good Will Ambassadors” for DoD. Were there any surprises?

“We traveled the United States, making it a point to tell everyone about the mission of Dogs on Deployment. It surprised us greatly that many people still hadn’t heard about this amazing program.

We enjoyed educating others on the important “No Dog Left Behind” DoD philosophy, and demonstrating how that relates to military family pets, and our family — specifically, we spoke on the unification of retired working dogs and their handlers.

On one trip to Colorado, Jessica was shopping in Denver and she happened upon a “Dog Is Good” display in a local pet boutique. Sure enough, there front and center, was the specially designed shirt inspired by Belle! You should have seen the surprise on her face and the excitement getting to share the story about it with the storeowners and shoppers!”

 

DOGS ON DEPLOYMENT: 

The Military Pet of the Year program enables Dogs on Deployment to raise awareness for responsible pet ownership.  What did you learn and share about responsible pet ownership?

“It’s disheartening to learn how many pets are re-homed every year due to military deployments, training and moves. Dogs on Deployment is an amazing non-profit, but is only effective if others know about it and utilize it! So, it’s about getting the word out there.

Belle loved utilizing social media to share her day to day life, but she also used her platform to raise awareness that no matter what, no dog (or pet) should be left behind!

Having such a large platform to raise awareness about Mission K9 Rescue was such a blessing. Their assistance in reuniting Belle and Sam after their combined service in Iraq, has forever changed our lives. Since Belle gained some attention serving as MPOTY 2016, Sam was presented with the opportunity to volunteer and train service dogs with Labs for Liberty. This led to his work creating a program at his university, uniting Labs for Liberty and the University, and even a featured article in the Alumni Magazine. One small title of MPOTY has had such a large domino effect on our family, changing our lives for the better, and hopefully impacting others as well.”

 

DOGS ON DEPLOYMENT: 

Were there any particular people / events that stood out, and why?

“Yes – one event that stood out to us was attending the Hero Dog Awards ceremony in Beverly Hills this past summer. We can’t express enough what an amazing opportunity that was to have been nominated in the top three of the military dog category out of all the nominees across the country. Even though Belle didn’t win, it was so much fun to gather with all our DoD friends at the event, to meet such other incredible dogs, hear others stories, and to share ours.

Throughout 2016, we worked with many outstanding volunteers, including DoD -founders, Shawn and Alicia Johnson. To finally put faces to names was something we never thought was possible! Belle loved being loved by everyone, and immensely enjoyed her photo shoot for “Dog is Good” for her Belle-inspired shirt.

Most especially, Belle enjoyed dancing the night away with daddy, Sam at the Hero Dog Awards, dressed in her red-carpet attire!”

 

Belle left her fatigues behind. She effortlessly handled the pupp – arazzi with grace and dignity as MPOTY 2016 for Dogs on Deployment.

 

DOGS ON DEPLOYMENT: 

What advice would you have for the upcoming MPOTY 2017 mascot? 

“Dive right in and enjoy every moment of this experience! It can be slightly scary putting your whole story out there for everyone to see and hear, but know that it’s for a great cause. Share as much good will and news as you can on your social media, and take every opportunity to spread the word about Dogs on Deployment!

We couldn’t have asked for a more amazing year, and are grateful to now have so many wonderful friends!”

 

Help Military Members and Their Pets

Dogs on Deployment is a national non-profit which provides a network for military members to search for volunteers willing to board their pets during their service commitments.

DoD aims to promote responsible, lifelong pet ownership within the military-pet community. One way we spotlight this goal is by hosting our annual Military Pet of the Year competition where our winner will be the Dogs on Deployment Mascot for one year, signifying their military owner’s commitment to a healthy, engaged lifestyle with their pet.

2017 DOD MILITARY PET OF THE YEAR CONTEST BEGINS

Military Members and Their Dogs, We Salute You!

Dogs on Deployment is a national non-profit which provides a network for military members to search for volunteers willing to board their pets during their service commitments.

At Dogs on Deployment, we aim to promote responsible, lifelong pet ownership within the military-pet community. One way we spotlight this goal is by hosting our annual Military Pet of the Year competition where our winner will be the Dogs on Deployment Mascot for one year, signifying their military owner’s commitment to a healthy, engaged lifestyle with their pet.

Military Pet Owners, Here is Your Chance

Attention military pet owners – your dog could be the next “Military Pet of the Year” mascot! The Dogs on Deployment annual Military Pet of the Year (MPOTY) competition has begun. During the annual MPOTY event, military members are invited to proudly show off their pets along with the rest of their families.

Does your dog have what it takes to be named the 2017 Military Pet of the Year?

Check out the contest timeline below!

Contest Timeline:

SUBMIT YOUR ENTRY:

1/15 at 7:00 am through 1/29 at 7:00 pm

VOTING IS OPEN:

2/5 at 7:00 am through 2/19 at 7:00 pm

JUDGING PERIOD:

2/20 at 7:00 am through 2/28 at 7:00 pm

WINNERS ANNOUNCED:

3/1 at 12:00 pm

(All times are EST.)

The MPOTY 2017 Application and Contest Entry Process

Your application must include:

  • Documentation proving military status
  • Basic information
  • A photo to be used for the contest, and
  • 500 written words on why your dog should be chosen as Dogs on Deployment’s 2016 Military Pet of the Year and Mascot.  This essay will be used as a caption for your dog’s photo during voting.

Examples of topics for your essay are:

  • How did you get the dog in the first place?
  • What are some difficulties you’ve had caring for the dog along with your service commitments?
  • Any illness/accidents your dog has overcome?
  • How do you exhibit being a responsible pet owner in the military, etc.?

 

Your entry will be reviewed by the Dogs on Deployment Board to ensure compliance with the contest entry requirements listed below. Any entry not meeting these requirements will be disqualified from the competition. Submit your entries beginning January 15th at 7 am EST; they may be submitted until January 29st at 7 pm EST, at which time the contest is closed to any and all submissions.

Voting begins February 5th at 7 am EST, and closes on February 19th at 7 pm EST. During this time, each person is allowed one vote within a 24-hour period.

The Dogs on Deployment Board of Trustees will then pick the winner from the top three finalists receiving the highest amounts of popular votes. The winner is announced on March 1st at 12 pm EST.

 

MPOTY Contest Entry Requirements and Code Overview

Entry and Photo Requirements

  • Dogs only
  • May be any adult breed dog (over 1-year-old)
  • Dog must be spayed or neutered unless involved with responsible dog showing or breeding
  • Dog must be owned by an active duty or reservist military member or honorably discharged veteran
  • Dog must be a family pet whose owner meets our “Code of a Military Pet Owner” (see below)
  • Photo must be high resolution; prefer no phone photos, +200dpi, larger than 1200px x 1200px print quality
  • Portrait or candid style photo of military owned dog
  • No more than two dogs may be shown in the photo for a single entry
  • No humans allowed in photo
  • Professional photographs preferred
  • Photo must be original to owner
  • Photo permissions must be given to Dogs on Deployment for reuse
  • Contestants may not pay for votes, or use online pay-advertising to promote voting
  • Winners must be willing to be photographed in uniform with your dog for Dogs on Deployment imagery
  • Winners must be willing to maintain a Facebook page for Dogs on Deployment’s 2016 Military Pet of the Year and Mascot for one year
  • Winners must be willing to attend local events and speak on behalf of Dogs on Deployment to potential media contacts

Code of a Military Pet Owner

I’m a US Military Member and pet owner. I promise to always have a plan for them. I promise never to abandon them. I promise to keep them healthy and vaccinated. I promise to spay or neuter them. * I promise to train and socialize them. I promise to love them as unconditionally as they love me. I promise to be a good pet owner while serving my country. I promise this.

Good Luck one and all!

 

Volunteer Spotlight: Amanda

At Dogs on Deployment, the only thing we love as much as animals, is the people who take care of them. That’s why we like to tell you about the volunteers who make us tick! This month, let’s talk about Amanda Beck, our Rhode Island Coordinator since 2014.

amanda dog 3Amanda, is an IT project manager by day, and a bridal consultant by night. But, her passion for both the military and animals is what drives her to volunteer with Dogs on Deployment. Her boyfriend, Josh is in the Massachusetts Army National Guard, both her grandfathers were in the Navy, and she grew up with a lot of military influence in her family. She says she “understands the sacrifices our service members make.”

Additionally, her cousin, Lt Michael Patrick Murphy was killed in action, in 2005. He received the Medal of Honor, posthumously. She says that he was her motivation behind her search for a “worthy military organization that I could dedicate my life to.”

amanda dog1 copyPlus, she grew up with dogs. She has a 10-year-old bichon/schnauzer mix named Bubba, and a 10-year-old American Eskimo/Cocker Spaniel mix named Pepper, who live with her parents on Long Island. She shares a rescue named Mara, a 9 month-old German Shepard/Lab Mix, with her boyfriend.

She says that growing up with dogs, she knows that there is nothing more unconditional than the love of an animal. “They were my best friends, my protectors and my sunshine on bad days.” Also, she says, “I see pets as family, not just animals.”

Amanda says that when her cousin was killed in action, there was a lot of publicity surrounding his death. As she sought places to volunteer her time, she says that she had a hard time finding respectable organizations that didn’t take more money than they gave.

amanda dog2When she found Dogs on Deployment, she was immediately impressed with DoD’s 100% volunteer force, their image, their mission, and their financial reports. She describes herself as “honored” and “privileged” to be a part of Dogs on Deployment. And you can’t blame her, not with special memories like her first event with DoD: Dogapalooza.

“While I was chatting with a woman and her husband about what we do, another lady came running out of nowhere, tears in her eyes and gave me this huge hug. She told me that we were the reason that her son was able to keep his dog.” The woman went on to tell Amanda that her son’s dog had been a life-saver for her son, that he’d suffered PTSD, and the dog had been vital to his recovery. Amanda has come to realize how important her work really is.

“It was at that point [that] I realized how impactful DoD has already been in the few short years it has existed. Knowing that, because of DoD, a soldier and his dog are still both living a happy life together makes me feel so good about what I do,” says Amanda.

Amanda encourages anyone, and everyone, to get involved with Dogs on Deployment, whether through their local chapter, or through fostering. “There are so many opportunities to volunteer,” she says. “Find the ones that fit you best!” She says to talk to your local coordinator and find out what they need and you’ll be amazed at how you can help.

Emergency Pet Boarding: Did you Know?

Every year, disaster strikes various parts of the country. Tornado alley during storm season. Hurricanes along the Eastern Seaboard. And, with weather getting more and more violent and unpredictable, it’s only smart to be prepared.

12065612_866507023418556_1625893803527395919_nOne of the parts of the country often hit hardest with disaster is California. Between earthquakes and wildfires, animals can easily be displaced, due to disaster.

We have written about emergency preparedness before, but did you know that, as a military member, displaced by emergency, you can post your pet for emergency fostering?

Register your pet with Dogs on Deployment, and find a safe place for your pet if you’ve ever been displaced for any reason.

Bailey: Another “Tail” of a Successful Pet Chit!

Everyone knows that Dogs on Deployment is there for service members when they need to find a safe, happy home when they are deployed. But, did you know that we are there for other things? For example, did you know that we can help provide financial assistance for veterinary care, or for emergencies?

Bailey 4When Adam and Rachel Revolinski were attending the Yellow Ribbon Program they ran across our organization. Dogs on Deployment was there to explain the services we provide to soldiers and veterans alike. Having just added a new puppy, Bailey, to their family, they were eager to find out how Dogs on Deployment might be able to help.

Once they got the chance to learn more about how we help those in the military provide for their animals while they serve our country, both were very impressed, especially for single pet owners. “It is hard to say goodbye to your pet during a deployment for several months,” Rachel said. “But to know that you could provide the with a good home while you’re away is a good feeling.”

Bailey 1Remembering Dogs on Deployment’s services is why, when they needed financial assistance to get Bailey spayed, they turned to Dogs on Deployment. They applied for the Pet Chit Financial Aid, and after filling out the necessary forms, Adam and Rachel were granted the money to pay for Bailey’s procedure.

After the procedure, Bailey recovered quickly. Rachel said that they did their best to keep their puppy calm so that they wouldn’t have to put the “white cone of shame” on her, but in the end, Bailey’s energy couldn’t be contained, and they had to concede. As it turns out, Bailey looked adorable in the cone, anyway!

These days, Bailey is growing up. She’s 65 pounds, and not done yet. She is energetic, but loving and gentle, and she surprises the Revolinskis everyday with her silliness.

Bailey 2Rachel recalls how when Bailey was younger, she was scared of loud noises, such as the icemaker. She would eye the untrustworthy refrigerator with trepidation, anytime Rachel went to it for ice. One day, she gave Bailey an ice cube after a particularly long walk, and she absolutely loved it. Now, whenever Rachel goes to get ice, Bailey is quickly ready to accept an ice cube of her own!

There are many services Dogs on Deployment provides for pet owners in the military, besides helping find homes for pets while you are deployed. We offer services such as Pet Chit Financial Aid that can help military families pay for their pet’s medical care.

PetsBestLogo

We are able to help pets like Bailey thanks to our partnership with Pet’s Best Insurance. Reach out to us if you think we can help in any way, and we will do our best to match your needs with our services. Every animal counts!

Volunteer Boarders Featured on Local News!

Georgetown, Texas couple, Rhonda and Mike Collins, a volunteer pet-foster couple,  just got a little more famous. Their story has just been featured on local, KVUE news.

They have been fostering Ryan Watson’s two amazing dogs, Lexi and Brewski, while he’s in Kuwait. They are looking forward to his return, in August, eager for an emotional and exciting reunion.

Screen Shot 2015-02-18 at 8.28.45 PM

To see the adorable pups, and get a feeling for what it’s like to be a volunteer foster family for our men and women in uniform, check out KVUE’s story and video!